MENOPAUSE

The Most Trusted Lab for Hormones

Since 1998, ZRT has tested the hormones of 1.25 million women around the world.

Menopause is not a single point in time when hormone production is switched off for good, but a gradual evolution that brings an end to female fertility. The ultimate pause in ovarian function is a normal feature of growing older that reshapes the way women think and feel as they phase into their “second adulthood.”

The right balance of hormones is vital to a woman’s health. But in menopause, when levels are dropping, a deficiency of one hormone can trigger a relative excess of another and result in common imbalances such as:

Estrogen Dominance or Low Progesterone

Results in mood swings, migraines, fat gain in hips and thighs

Low Estrogen or Fluctuations of Estrogen

Triggers hot flashes, night sweats, palpitations, foggy thinking, memory lapse & vaginal dryness

Low Testosterone or DHEA

Leads to decreases in bone or muscle mass, metabolism, energy, strength, stamina, exercise tolerance & libido

High Cortisol

Results in insomnia, anxiety, sugar cravings, feeling tired but wired & increased belly fat

Low Cortisol

Causes chronic fatigue, low energy, food and sugar cravings, poor exercise tolerance or recovery & low immune reserves

Neurotransmitter Imbalance

Changes in estrogen and progesterone levels can impact neurotransmitter levels. For instance, a drop in estrogen can result in a drop in serotonin.

Thyroid Imbalance

Changes in estrogen levels can lead to thyroid symptoms like slowed metabolism and always feeling cold. In fact, many women experiencing menopause will be diagnosed with hypothyroidism.

Low Vitamin D

Sufficient levels of Vitamin D, estrogen and testosterone are important for maintaining bone health in the menopause years.

Learn More About Menopause


Recommended for Practitioners:

Webinar: The Menopause Mind


Recommended for Patients:

Webinar: Everything You Wanted to Know About Menopause

Handbook: Menopause & Your Health

Blog: The Five W’s of Menopause

See the Profiles

To restore the vital balance of hormones, we first need a detailed, accurate measurement of hormone levels. Not just numbers, but an assessment that offers real meaning.

Confused about when to test in saliva, blood, and urine? Click here to learn more.

Hormone Profiles

Saliva Profile I – E2, Pg, T, DS & Cx1

Saliva Profile II – E2, Pg, T, DS & Cx2

Saliva Profile III – E2, Pg, T, DS & Cx4 (Sample Report)

Female Combo Profile I – E2, Pg, T, DS, Cx4 (saliva); TSH, fT3, fT4, TPOab (blood spot) (Sample Report)

Female Como Profile II – Cx4 (saliva); E2, Pg, T, SHBG, DS, TSH, fT3, fT4, TPOab (blood spot) (Sample Report)

Estrogen Essential Profile – A baseline view of how a patient is metabolizing estrogens. 12 tests.

Estrogen Elite Profile – Estrogen, progesterone and select androgen metabolites with BPA. 20 tests.

Advanced Profile – Our broadest view of sex steroid hormone metabolite levels and cortisol metabolism with full diurnal melatonin and BPA. 44 tests. (Sample Report)

Thyroid Profiles & Vitamin D

Essential Thyroid Profile – fT3, fT4, TPOab & TSH (Sample Report)

Vitamin D Profile – 25-OH, Total (D2, D3)

Neurotransmitter Profiles

NeuroBasic Profile – GABA, Glu, DA, Epi, NE, 5-HT, PEA

NeuroIntermediate Profile – GABA, Glu, Gly, DA, Epi, NE, HIST, 5-HT, PEA

NeuroAdvanced Profile – GABA, Glu, Gly, DA, Epi, NE, HIST, 5-HT, PEA, DOPAC, HVA, 5-HIAA, NMN, VMA (Sample Report)

Saliva Hormones add-on – E2, Pg, T, DS, C

Urine Hormones add-on – E2, Pregnanediol, Allopregnanolone, Androstenedione, T, DHT, DHEA, 5α,3α-Androstanediol

Diurnal Cortisol add-on – Free Cortisol x 4, Free Cortisone x 4

Diurnal Cortisol & Melatonin add-on – Free Cortisol x 4, Free Cortisone x 4, Melatonin (MT6s) x 4

Diurnal Cortisol, Norepinephrine & Epinephrine add-on – Free Cortisol x 4, Free Cortisone x 4, NE x 4, Epi x 4

Diurnal Cortisol, Melatonin, Norepinephrine & Epinephrine add-on – Free Cortisol x 4, Free Cortisone x 4, Melatonin (MT6s) x 4, NE x 4, Epi x 4

Reference Information

ZRT Overview of Profiles

ZRT Test Directory & Abbreviations

FAQs

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